Tag Archives: black pride

You Were Too Busy

You never saw me. Oh you saw the color of my skin but you never saw me. 

How could you?

When I walked in the store you were too busy following me around.

When I sat down at my desk you were too busy wondering how did I get into this school. 

When I moved into my office you were too busy thinking I was just another affirmative action hire. 

When I moved into my home you were too busy wondering if the property value would go down.

But what you didn’t see is while you were too busy to see me I was too busy to see you either.

Not because of the color of your skin.

That was of no Importance to me,

Because I know you have the system rigged against me  

I was too busy studying and working twice as hard as you.

I was too busy finishing in the top 10% of my high school class.

I was too busy deciding what university was worthy of me accepting their full academic scholarship.

I was too busy graduating from that university summa cum laude.

I was too busy upon graduation shifting through my countless job offers

I was too busy purchasing my home because that full academic scholarship I got meant I didn’t have all that student debt you did.

So since you can’t see me let me tell you who I am.

I’m that person who will never fake who I am just to make you feel comfortable, 

who has no desire to prove my worth to you, 

who will never apologize for the hue of my skin.

So, you keep busy looking at my beautiful bronze skin 

or

get with the times and see me for who I am.

Either way I’m going to keep soaring.F5167870-9AAD-48EF-9F41-E53E1F938343

 

Like the giant oak tree…

Our lives have always mattered

Our voices can never be silenced

Our beauty is undeniable

Our intellect is unsurpassed

From our land mankind was born

From Kings and Queens we descended

Our freedom you did take

But

Our minds always have been free

Our hearts always have been free

Our souls always have been free

And because you could not capture them

We have soared

Our contributions undeniable, too numerous to dismiss

Our history is not just our history

Our history is American history

Like the giant oak tree we are rooted in the very fabric of this country

Without us it would not exist

As James Brown exclaimed

Say it loud

We are BLACK and we are PROUD!

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A Few Bad Men

Donald Trump we live in a world that has walls of racial inequities and injustices and those walls have to be torn down by groups like ours. Whose gonna do it you? You Mitch McConnell? We have a greater responsibility that you can possibly fathom. You fight to “Make America Great Again” and you curse Black Lives Matter. You have the luxury. You have the luxury of not experiencing what we do everyday, that Racism while seemingly invisible to you is an inherent part of American culture and our existence while grotesque, and incomprehensible, to you, is about making America live up to its promise that all people are created equal, about FINALLY MAKING AMERICA GREAT. We have neither the time, nor the inclination to explain ourselves, to a man who rises and sleeps under the freedoms of white privilege, and than questions why we demand equality! We’d rather you just said ‘thank you’, and went on your way. Otherwise We suggest you wake up and join us in the ever expanding Coalition of the Righteous and stand for equality. Either way, we don’t give a damn, what you think you makes America great.

Black is Beautiful

Drug dealers, gang bangers, fatherless, welfare dependent, prisoners are some of the images that the media bombard us with. When faced with these images on a daily basis many of us begin to accept them and have lower life expectations of ourselves. In essence we are letting the stereotypes of others define who we are rather than defining ourselves. The positive images of African Americans is often that of athletes and hip hop stars implying that their are limited roads to success within the African-American community. Protest against social injustice by African Americans stars is spun as unpatriotic  and done by individuals who are fortunate that society has given them so much. Notice I said given not earned because for many the thought of the African American working hard and earning their position in society is a foreign concept. As Cater G. Woodson said to handicap a student by teaching him that his black face is a curse and that his struggle to change his condition is hopeless is the worst sort of lynching.”

1984 brought us the Cosby Show centered on the lives of the fictional Huxtables obstetrician Cliff his lawyer wife Claire, and their children Sondra, Denise, Vanessa and Rudy, and son Theo. The show was unique in that not only did it depict an upper middle class African American family, we had seen that before on shows such as the Jeffersons, but one that was led by not one but two professionals. They were portrayed as simply a family residing in Brooklyn, not a African American family simply a family. They were not the exception to the rule rather they were just another successful family.  The Huxtables showed us that African Americans can achieve, can be successful, can be a mother and a father who have children who attend college because isn’t that what all kids do when they graduate high school. They were the embodiment of what all American families white and black strive to be.

2008 brought us Barack Obama who against all odds became America’s first African American President. Something many of believed we would never live to see. He was a highly educated man of color and a dedicated husband and father.  While in office some media outlets looked to marginalize his accomplishments, question his citizenship and disintegrate his character but thanks to his magnetic personality and superior oratory skills President Obama was able to overcome media attempts to downplay or mischaracterize him. He represented himself with a class and dignity rarely seen by a politician and won respect and admiration not only from Americans but world wide. His wife Michelle  a strong, educated, beautiful woman of color, so much so that the thought of her running for President today does not seem out of the realm of possibility, was also at times a victim of certain media outlets attempt to paint the Obama’s in a poor light. But like her husband she too possessed a magnetic personality and superior oratory skills which easily allowed her to deflect any negativity aimed at her. The Obamas represented what is possible for all African Americans. No longer was it a fantasy to tell your child they could grow up to be President because it has been accomplished and with accomplished with dignity and class.

2018 brought us the hugely success Marvel movie Black Panther. Movie theaters were packed with people of color young and old, men and women, some who hadn’t been to a movies in years. They left the theater not only entertained by the movie itself but with a pride of their culture. Wakanda after all was undeniably African. Its citizens highly educated, its women depicted as strong and beautiful, its men strong and dedicated to family. Wakanda forever became a calling card of many because the imaged world of Wakanda represented a look at what African Americans could be. That we could fly above the clouds and achieve greatness.

One cannot quantify the impact the positive images of these fictional and non fictional African Americans have had on the African American community as a whole but it has no doubt allowed some of us to dream of possibilities to consider what we can accomplish regardless of the color of our skin.  This begs the question as to what is the responsibility of successful African Americans in giving back to their community. For many successful African Americans success is often measured by moving out of their community into a predominantly white community.  Leaving behind many of those they used to associate with in exchange for new friends who are predominantly white. Rejecting much of the culture they were raised in to better fit their new surroundings. They reject African American businesses citing their supposed inferiority to that of businesses run by others. It as Cater G Woodson said “Negro banks, as a rule, have failed because the people, taught that their own pioneers in business cannot function in this sphere, 

It is ironic that Harlem one of the bastions of African America culture has in recent years seen a renaissance not as the result of successful African Americans returning but to an influx of white people. Unfortunately as this great community strengthens African Americans are pushed out

So is it truly the responsibility of the successful African American to as Lebron James said in his 2017 ESPY awards speech “go back to our communities, invest our time, our resources, help rebuild them, help strengthen them, help change them.” In this writers opinion the answer is an unequivocal yes. As each successful generation serves as positive role models and mentors, invests in the building of a strong and prosperous infrastructure that employs those in the community and affords the children of those adults the opportunity to attain a quality education the foundation is put in place where success is not seen as the exception but the norm. The perception of the African American image within ourselves changes from one that is not worthy and of limited possibilities to one who is exceptional and has unlimited opportunities before them. As Fredrick Douglas said The soul that is within me no man can degrade”

The building of this thought process will not come easy as Carole Mosley-Braun so pointedly put it  “Defining myself, as opposed to being defined by others, is one of the most difficult challenges I face” and as Malcolm X once said “Nobody can give you freedom. Nobody can give you equality or justice or anything. If you’re a man, you take it.”  Simply put the African American can not wait for others to “save” us, to build up our communities, to employ our men and women, to educate our children and most importantly to pass down the history of our many accomplishments. The African American must act from within to achieve these goals. We must set the groundwork so that. each succeeding generation grows up with the belief as the 1970’s slogan said Black is Beautiful. That they shout from the mountain tops what James Brown once sang I’m black and I’m proud. That they define themselves and not let others define them.

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